What's New!   
 

News, Notes, and Current Items of Interest From KinKonnect

 

Our "What's New" Page is a great place to find out about kinship related news.
Please check in on our What's New Page often, as it will be continually updated.


To jump to a specific entry, simply click on one of the links below:

01/23/2010
Raising Your Grandchildren


09/30/2009
UMD Case Transracial Research


09/17/2009
HHS Awards $35 Million to States for Increasing Adoptions


09/15/2009
DCF PRESS RELEASE - New Jersey Launches New Campaign to Support Foster Care and Prevent Child Abuse

 

09/12/2009

Examining Judges’ Perspectives on Termination of Parental Rights and Adoption of Foster Children


09/11/2009
Webcasts and Websites


09/11/2009
Kinship Tools From the States


09/11/2009
Tools For Working With Kinship

 

09/10/09
Impact of Kinship Care on Children


09/09/2009
Training Kin to be Foster Parents

09/08/2009
NRCFCPP Information Packet

07/23/2009
The Benefits of and Barriers to Out-of-School Programs for Youth


07/22/2009
New Resources on NYSCCC Website


07/20/2009
New Jersey Parents Caucus Presents 2nd Annual NJ Community Outreach & Advocacy Tour

07/16/2009
Safe Haven Commercial Begins Statewide in Louisiana


07/06/2009
Siblings find each other after 53 years


06/22/2009
Highlights of Recent Kinship Care State Legislative Enactments


06/11/2009
Happy to be called the 'birth mother's husband'

06/10/2009
Application for Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Youth Program for the year 2009


06/01/2009
Raising Katie
What adopting a white girl taught a black family about race in the Obama era.


05/20/2009
Income Eligibility Schedules for Publically Subsidized Child Care Assistance or Services 2009

05/13/2009
NRCFCPPP’s Complete Listing of State Foster Care Contacts

05/06/2009
Create a Lifebook : Free Course 'til June 1st


05/05/09
State-Level Differences in Child and Family Well-Being


04/20/2009
Youth Benefit From Strong Families Regardless of Income

04/01/09
Higher Education/ College Scholarship Information from Foster and Adoptive Family Services.

03/26/2009
Allocation of Title IV-E stimulus funds may help forestall cuts in foster care and adoption assistance that some states are currently considering

03/19/2009
White House Internship Program


03/19/2009
Camp Excell: Programs Available in Monmouth and Bergen County


03/11/2009
CPFA Upcoming program and Discussion


02/24/2009
Summary and Section-by-Section Description of the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (H.R.6893)


02/24/2009
Extended Families help Children avoid Foster Care


02/04/2009
Finding Family Roots is Relatively Easy


02/04/2009
Adopted Children and IQ


02/04/2009
Effects of Childhood Stress


02/02/2009
Childhood Stress Affects Health Years Later


01/22/2009/
Adoption Costs Piece on Today Show


01/21/2009
The Heart Gallery Newest Project 


01/21/2009
Heart Gallery Reception at Johnson &Johnson  

 

01/07/2009
Facts at a Glance



01/23/2010
Raising Your Grandchildren

No matter why or how they came to live with you, your grandchildren will benefit from being in your home. When children cannot be with their parents, living with a grandparent may provide.
To learn more please click here.

 

09/30/2009
UMD Case Transracial Research

The University of Maryland Department of Family Sciences and The Center for Adoption Support and Education are working together to facilitate this important national study of transracial adoptive families. Be part of cutting-edge research to help families like yours!
If you're an adoptive parent of a teen, this might be your opportunity to be part of a national, cutting-edge research project that could lead to improved services and resources for families like yours.
To see the UMD Case transracial research Flyer please click here.



09/17/2009
HHS Awards $35 Million to States for Increasing Adoptions

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) today awarded $35 million to 38 states and Puerto Rico for increasing the number of children adopted from foster care.  States use the funds from the adoption incentive award to enhance their programs for abused and neglected children.
“Adopting a child from foster care is a wonderful way to enrich any family’s life,” said HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.  “We congratulate the states that performed so well this year and we thank the parents who are providing loving and permanent homes.”
To read the entire article please click here.



09/15/2009
DCF PRESS RELEASE - New Jersey Launches New Campaign to Support Foster Care and Prevent Child Abuse


The New Jersey Department of Children and Families (DCF) and Casey Family Programs today launched a new campaign – Raise Me Up – aimed at inspiring people to support children in foster care to help prevent child abuse and neglect in communities throughout the state. Raise Me Up campaign is an initiative of Casey Family Programs, the largest national foundation with a sole mission to advocate for children in foster care.
To read the entire article please click here.


 

09/12/2009

Examining Judges’ Perspectives on Termination of Parental Rights and Adoption of Foster Children

A new Child Trends research brief explores the issues that judges consider when making decisions about termination of parental rights and adoption of foster children.  The brief, The Timing of Termination of Parental Rights: A Balancing Act for Children's Best Interests, is based on interviews with 20 judges from 18 states.
The federal Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 shortens the timeframe for terminating parental rights (TPR) as a way to facilitate timely adoptions for children in foster care who cannot be reunited with their birth parents. The interviews suggest that while judges are concerned about terminating birth parents' rights to a child before an adoptive family has been identified, recent innovations in case practice have helped to address these concerns and have made for a less divisive decision-making process.
This research brief also presents the study's implications for juvenile and family court policy and practices: the advantages of judges and caseworkers exploring children's views about TPR and adoption; ways for foster children to maintain birth family connections to support their well-being while in foster care and after adoption; the importance of judges having familiarity with adoption recruitment efforts to inform their decisions; and the importance of seeking consultation and guidance for judges on the requirements of the Adoption and Safe Families Act.




09/11/2009
Webcasts and Websites


This webcast from the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, in partnership with Case Family Programs, brought together national experts and state officials to discuss the benefits that kinship care affords children as well as examples of how leaders in the states are supporting kinship families.
Supporting Kinship Families: What State Policymakers Can Do


This web site from the American Bar Association is intended to serve as a toolkit for attorneys, judges, and other child-serving practitioners working with kinship families and having difficulty navigating the complex existing and emerging legal issues. Topics covered include Financial Assistance for Kinship Care Providers; Educational Consent and School Enrollment; Statutory Preferences for Relative Placement; Medical Consent; Kinship Navigator Programs; and Licensing Policies.
Kinship Care Legal Research Center


The Urban Institute has published a number of discussion papers and policy briefs on kinship care.
The Urban Institute


This portion of the Children's Defense Fund website presents a number of useful publications on relative care giving.
Childrens Defense Fund


The AARP GIC offers a website with lots of articles and message boards, booklets in English and Spanish, a free newsletter for grandparents who are raising their grandchildren, information and referral to grandparent support groups and agencies, networking and assistance to local, state, and national organizations, research about grand parenting, support for AARP state offices that are working with grandparents at the local level, and advocacy for grandparents in collaboration with AARP's State Affairs and Legal Advocacy groups.
AARP Grandparent Information Center


NDAS, at the Child Welfare League of America, has developed a website section that includes information pertinent to kinship demographics, funding, policies and providers.
National Data Analysis System - Kinship Care Data


CLASP is an advocacy organization whose roles is to support policies that strengthen families and create paths to work and education. 
Center for Law and Social Policy


The Brookdale Foundation Group works to advance the field of gerontology and improve the lives of senior citizens.  Their Relatives as Parents Program (RAPP) provides support to grandparents assuming the primary care giving roles.
Brookdale Foundation Group


The mission of Generations United is to improve the lives of children, youth, and older people through intergeneration collaboration and policy development.
Generations United



09/11/2009
Kinship Tools From the States


A comprehensive list of kinship care family resources and services from the United Way of Connecticut.
To read the entire article please click below.
Connecticut Kinship Navigator



This program offers a comprehensive information and referral network for caregivers to learn more about services and to obtain referrals to legal, financial, educational, health/mental health, support-group and housing resources in their area. Information provided includes answers to frequently asked questions; eligibility requirements for public assistance, tax credits and childcare; access to official records; facts sheets on laws; and forums for service providers.
To read the entire article please click below.
New York State Kinship Navigator


Developed by the NYS Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) in partnership with the NYS Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), Having a Voice & a Choice: New York State Handbook for Relatives Raising Children was written for relatives who are raising, or considering raising, children in need of a stable home because their parents are unable to take care of them. The handbook discusses the various options available to relatives so they can make the best decisions for their own situations. Chapters cover topics such as how children come into the care of relatives, legal arrangements, financial support for nonparent caregivers and foster parents, health care and health insurance, and school-related issues. At the end is a list of websites and other resources.
To read the entire article please click below.
Having a Voice & a Choice: New York State Handbook for Relatives Raising Children



This manual is intended to help service providers and policymakers use the lessons learned in the Kinship Navigator Pilot to expand and improve programs that support kinship caregivers of children and youth. The manual contents are based upon observations, interviews, and discussions with project staff, focus groups and surveys with kinship caregivers served by the pilot initiative. It provides a summary of the program’s background, philosophy and implementation steps offering a solid foundation for developing a Kinship Navigator program.
To read the entire article please click below.
Washington Kinship Navigator Pilot Project Replication Manual



09/11/2009
Tools For Working With Kinship



This document provides resources that will of assistance to kinship caregivers.  Child welfare professionals will also be able to find training materials, assessment tools, and handbooks for kinship caregivers. The resources are up-to-date, easy to access, and practical for caregivers.
To read the entire article please click below.
Tools for Working with Kinship Caregivers


The information in this NRCFCPPP tool can help child welfare agency and court practitioners evaluate whether or not kinship care is an option in any particular case.
To read the entire article please click below.
Tools for Permanency - Kinship Care


This packet contains statistics, information, and descriptions of model programs for children in kinship care with health issues.
To read the entire article please click below.

Health Care Issues for Children in Kinship Care



This article provides a good overview of financial assistance that is available, and practical advice for applying.  It also provides useful links to other sources of information.
To read the entire article please click below.
Financial Assistance for Kinship Caregivers


This article provides a good overview of health insurance, and practical advice for applying.  It also provides links to other information and sites.
To read the entire article please click below.
Finding Health Insurance for your Grandchildren


This 2002 report offers still-timely information regarding the provision of supports to African-American caregivers. African American Kinship Caregivers: Principles for Developing Supportive Programs was authored by Jennifer Szolnoki and Katharine Cahn. Originally developed to inform local grant making, it is based on a literature review of 45 published articles. Strengths, issues, and needs of African-American caregivers are identified and seven core principles for support programs are outlined.  The report concludes with a brief summary of each of the reviewed articles.
To read the entire article please click below.
African-American Kinship Caregivers: Principles for Developing Supportive Programs




09/10/09
Impact of Kinship Care on Children


This study from the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine examined the influence of kinship care on behavioral problems after 18 and 36 months in out-of-home care. The authors concluded that children placed into kinship care had fewer behavioral problems 3 years after placement than children who were placed into foster care. This finding supports efforts to maximize placement of children with willing and available kin when they enter out-of-home care.
To read the entire article please click below.
Impact of Kinship Care on Behavioral Well-being for Children in Out-of-Home Care



This project from the University of Oxford followed up a cohort of 113 children, removed from their parents’ care by the courts because of child protection concerns, who were then placed with members of their extended families or social networks.
To read the entire article please click below.
Outcomes for Abused and Neglected Children Placed With Family or Friends Carers Through Care Proceedings



The Social Work Research Center at Colorado State University conducted this systematic review of quantitative research on kinship care in the United States. For this study, the child welfare outcomes were permanency, behavior problems, mental health service utilization, reentry, adaptive behaviors, family relations, mental health problems, and educational attainment. According to the research, children in kinship care experience better outcomes in regard to behavior problems, reentry, adaptive behaviors, family relations, and mental health problems than do children in foster care. However, children placed with kin are less likely to achieve permanency and utilize mental health services.
To read the entire article please click below.
Kinship Care in the United States: A Systematic Review of Evidence-Based Research


This kinship care outcome study was conducted by the Social Work Research Center on behalf of the Applied Research in Child Welfare (ARCh) Project, which is a collaboration between the Colorado Department of Human Services twelve counties. The study employed a matched case design to compare children in kinship care with children in foster care on available child welfare outcomes. According to the findings, kinship care appears to be an evidence-based practice from both an outcome and cost-effectiveness perspective.
To read the entire article please click below.
Child Welfare Outcomes in Colorado: A Matched Comparison Between Children in Kinship and Foster Care


This report from Generations United presents the latest findings on the impact of relative care for children in foster care, describes the role of relatives as permanent families for the children in their care, and offers cost-effective ways to support relatives as caregivers through federal policy. It finds that children in relative foster care tend to be just as safe, or safer than, children placed with non-relative families. These placements often allow children to remain in their neighborhoods and schools and to live with their siblings.
To read the entire article please click below.
Support Relatives in Providing Foster Care and Permanent Families for Children



09/09/2009
Training Kin to be Foster Parents

States have a variety of approaches regarding training and assessment for kinship caregivers. We have assembled information from the majority of the states here. States were contacted in Spring and Summer 2009.  Note that this is not a comprehensive list of all training policies.
To read the entire article please click below.
State Training Requirements for Kinship Caregivers


This issue brief from Child Focus provides an overview of efforts to adapt foster parent training to the unique needs and circumstances of kinship caregivers. The following topics are addressed: federal licensing requirements, including requirements for foster care training as a condition of licensing; limitations of traditional foster parent training for kinship caregivers; state and county efforts to develop foster parent training programs tailored specifically for kin; common themes related to kin-specific training; and questions that states and localities should consider as they develop kin-specific training.  This document was updated in 2009.
To read the entire article please click below.
Best Practices from the Field


This competency-based curriculum was developed by the National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Planning in March of 2002. It is intended to be used in coordination with your existing state laws, policies and best practices regarding safety and family study assessments, placement, permanency planning efforts, child and family well-being initiatives and foster/adoptive family licensing/approval procedures.
To read the entire article please click below.
Assessing Adult Relatives as Preferred Caregivers in Permanency Planning


The actual curriculum for this workshop from the Pennsylvania Child Welfare Training Program can be downloaded for use.  The workshop is designed to enhance Child Welfare Professionals' understanding of the context of practice in kinship care, how to convene the kinship network, empowering the family, and supporting a permanency plan for the family all which is essential to the case planning and service delivery for children placed in kinship care.
To read the entire article please click below.
Achieving Permanency for Children in Kinship Foster Care


This curriculum from the California Social Work Education Center may be downloaded for use.  The curriculum focuses on factors that may lead to differential placement outcomes for children who have become dependents of the court, as the result of abuse and neglect, and have been placed with kin rather than in traditional foster homes. The material is intended for use in training child welfare staff, including line workers, supervisors, and managers.
To read the entire article please click below.
Factors Leading to Premature Terminations of Kinship Care Placements: An Empirically-Based Curriculum 


This curriculum by Child Welfare League of America is designed specifically for preparation of kinship caregivers.  The nine session curriculum provides kinship caregivers with 27 hours of valuable information and support related to kinship care.  Sessions designed to facilitate interaction and the sharing of experiences and support among participants.  This program has been created for use by a broad spectrum of agencies: elder service programs; community social service and mental health agencies; kinship care resource centers; faith-affiliated, community-based, or other types of support groups; and public and private child welfare organizations. Rather than functioning primarily as a trainer, the person managing the group assumes the role of facilitator. Sessions are designed to allow the facilitator flexibility to respond to the needs, dynamics, and makeup of each group.
This reasonably priced curriculum can be ordered by contacting:
E-Mail:  order@cwla.org
Website:  http://www.cwla.org/pubs/



These materials can be downloaded at no cost and are intended for preparing child welfare caseworkers to engage family members in the development of a permanent plan.  The material uses video clips to enhance learning.  The six modules covered include:
The Context of Practice in Kinship Foster Care
The Sociocultural Contexts of Kinship Care
Substance Abuse and its Impact on Family Systems
Convening the Kinship Network
Decision-Making and Family Empowerment
Supporting Permanent Plans
The Kinship Care Practice Project


The Kinship Training Program is for child welfare workers and is organized around four 3-hour modules. Each module is designed to provide factual information, sensitize workers to the strengths and needs of kinship families, and to highlight strategies and techniques for developing effective helping relationships. Each module includes video or case stimuli, didactics and/or small group exercises.
The Kinship Caregiver Forums are developed specifically for kinship caregivers.  The forums provide participants the opportunity to discuss issues of concern, exchange ideas, and develop supportive networks.. Each forum provides instructions for the presentation of the session as well as participant handouts. The individual forums include such topics as Family Traditions, Divided Loyalties, and Community Resources.
To read the entire article please click below.
The Kinship Training Program and The Kinship Caregiver Forums 


This manual is a 14-session workshop designed to help grandparents who are raising their grandchildren alone. Group leaders can revise and expand upon the themes presented here to fit the needs of their particular work groups. Some of the main issues that are explored are: useful tips for grandparents on how to communicate effectively with their grandchildren on all topics ranging from drugs and sex, to sexually transmitted diseases; helping them learn how to deal with loss and abandonment issues; helping them develop and maintain self-esteem; dealing with special behavior problems; and appropriate ways of instilling and maintaining rules in the home.
To read the entire article please click below.
Empowering Grandparents Raising Grandchildren:   A Training Manual for Group Leaders. 



09/08/2009
NRCFCPP Information Packet

This information packet prepared by NRCFCPP provides a good summary of kinship care including definitions, statistics, significant policy and legislation, model programs and practices, and websites.
To read the entire article please click here.


This white paper examines need policy changes so that more children can better benefit from kinship care.  The white paper explores the benefits of kinship care, as well as areas where research has shown that there may be concerns.  The paper also examines policies, programs, and supports that are available to kinship families.
To read the entire article please click here.



In a unique national partnership, AARP Foundation, Brookdale Foundation Group, Casey Family Programs, Child Welfare League of America, Children's Defense Fund, and Generations United have compiled and released state fact sheets and one national fact sheet that include census data, local programs and resources, state foster care policies, public benefit programs, important state laws, and important state laws.
To read the entire article please click below.
State Fact Sheets for Grandparents and Other Relatives Raising Children


The Fostering Connections Act of 2008 is one of the most significant pieces of child welfare legislation ever passed.  This user friendly document was put together by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and fifteen national organizations to provide an overview of the new Fostering Connections Act.  The article provides information regarding the impact the legislation will have for children living in kinship care.
to read the entire article please click here.


This document from the National Conference of State Legislatures highlights recently enacted State legislation addressing kinship care for children receiving child welfare services. Legislation is described in the following areas: allowing grandparents and other relative caregivers to access medical care and treatment for children; allowing caregivers to enroll children in schools; promoting the placement of children with relatives; subsidizing guardianship and providing kinship foster care and other caregiver subsides and supports; allowing informal caregivers to qualify as de facto custodians with the right to initiate proceedings for appointment of a guardian; establishing a variety of study groups, task forces and oversight committees charged with examining issues facing kinship care providers; and authorizing kinship care navigator projects to help caregivers navigate their way through various systems such as child welfare, child care, TANF, health, legal/judicial, education and other services. Different State initiatives in each of these areas are described.
To read the entire article please click below.
Highlights of recent Kinship Care Legislation (National Conference of State Legislature Enactments, February 2008)


This document from NCSL summarizes legislation that was enacted in 35 different States from 1997-2006 that addresses kinship care for children receiving child welfare services.
To read the entire article please click below.
Selected State Kinship Care Legislative Enactments, 1997-2006



This report, State Kinship Care Policies for Children that Come to the Attention of Child Welfare Agencies: Findings from the 2007 Casey Kinship Foster Care Policy Survey, funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Casey Family Programs, is the result of interviews with state child welfare agencies around the country about their kinship care practices. Particular attention is given to the engagement of relatives in order to divert the need for children to enter foster care. (December 2008).
To read the entire article please click below.
State Kinship Care Policies for Children that Come to the Attention of Child Welfare Agencies



In order for States to receive Federal payments for foster care and adoption assistance, Federal law requires that they "consider giving preference to an adult relative over a non-related caregiver when determining placement for a child, provided that the relative caregiver meets all relevant State child protection standards." Current through January 2008, this information provided by the Child Welfare Information Gateway summarizes State statutes regarding relatives for placement or guardianship, requirements for placement with relatives, relatives who may adopt, and requirements for adoption by relatives.
To read the entire article please click below.
Placement of Children with Relatives


 

07/23/2009
The Benefits of and Barriers to Out-of-School Programs for Youth

Research suggests that participation in out-of-school time programs and activities can lessen the likelihood that youth will engage in negative behaviors, such as using drugs and alcohol, dropping out of school, and practicing unhealthy eating habits. Despite these benefits, millions of youth still do not participate in these programs. Three new Child Trends briefs explore the various reasons for nonparticipation.
To read the entire article please click here.



07/22/2009
New Resources on NYSCCC Website


To view new resources on the New York State Citizens’ Coalition for Children, including a Guide to Starting and Managing Parent Support Groups, click here

 

07/20/2009
New Jersey Parents Caucus Presents 2nd Annual NJ Community Outreach & Advocacy Tour

Calling All Parents & Caregivers Who are Struggling with Finding Supports & Services for their Children
NJPC is bringing Services via our 25 Foot Community Outreach RV to Your Neighborhood!
Onsite Services Include: Street Outreach, Registration for Parent Education Programs, Information & Referral Services, Parent Advocacy,  Man Talk Fatherhood Initiative, NJ Youth Justice Initiative
Onsite NJPC Staff Include: Community Based Parent Advocates, Masters of Social Work (MSW), Licensed School Psychologist, Volunteers
Elizabeth – Broad St. & Dickerson St. - August 8, 10 to 5PM
Trenton – Walnut Ave. – August 13, 12 to 5PM
Asbury Park – Springwood & Borden Ave – August 19, 2 to 6PM
Atlantic City – 1539 Adriatic Ave. - August 20, 1 to 6PM
Newark – Bradley Court, 48 Munn Ave. – August 26, 2 to 7PM
Flyer attached for your review.  For more information, call (973) 989-8866 or email info@njparentcaucus.org   www.newjerseyparentscaucus.org



07/16/2009
Safe Haven Television Commercial Begins Statewide Run Ad reminding parents of law will air through Labor Day

The commercials reiterate that, through the Safe Haven law, parents who choose not to use an adoption agency and feel they can care for their newborn can relinquish the baby up to 31-days-old at any hospital, police or fire station with no questions asked.
To read the entire article please click here.



07/06/2009
Siblings find each other after 53 years


Little Rickie Webb was barely out of diapers when his entire world turned upside down. Up until then, he had a pretty idyllic life. He lived with his seven older brothers and mom and dad on an Army base in Northern California. His dad wasn’t home very much because he ran transport missions for the military during World War II — before Rickie was even born  — up through the Korean War.
Rickie’s oldest brother, Larry, remembers having the run of the grounds at Fort Ord and playing sports and going fishing with their mom. Betty Webb was from Grass Valley, a small town north and a little east of Sacramento, nestled in the foothills of the Sierras. Larry says she was quite the outdoorswoman. She enjoyed deer hunting, fishing and riding horses and instilled in him an appreciation for nature. Overall, life was going pretty well for the young family.
To read the entire article please click here



06/22/2009
Highlights of Recent Kinship Care State Legislative Enactments


To visit National Conference of State Legislatures hosting the Highlights of Recent Kinship Care State Legislative Enactments
please click here.



06/11/2009
Happy to be called the 'birth mother's husband'

In all of my 40 years of living, I've been called a lot of things. Over the past 10 years, however, I've had one title only a few people hold - the "birth mother's husband." I was referred to as the "birth mother's husband" this past April while attending a wedding for my wife Bobbi's "birth" daughter, Chrystal Chartier-Wittenmyer. The reference normally comes whenever she introduces my wife: "This is my birth mother...," and then me: "This is my birth mother's..." You get the idea. To read the entire article please click here.


06/10/2009
Application for Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Youth Program for the year 2009.


To print the application please click here.
 

06/01/2009
Raising Katie
What adopting a white girl taught a black family about race in the Obama era.

Several pairs of eyes follow the girl as she pedals around the playground in an affluent suburb of Baltimore. But it isn't the redheaded fourth grader who seems to have moms and dads of the jungle gym nervous on this recent Saturday morning. It's the African-American man—six feet tall, bearded and wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt—watching the girl's every move. Approaching from behind, he grabs the back of her bicycle seat as she wobbles to a stop. "Nice riding," he says, as the fair-skinned girl turns to him, beaming. "Thanks, Daddy," she replies. The onlookers are clearly flummoxed.
to read the entire article please click here



05/20/2009
Income Eligibility Schedules for Publically Subsidized Child Care Assistance or Services 2009

To see the schedules please click here.


05/13/2009
NRCFCPPP’s Complete Listing of State Foster Care Contacts

The National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Planning has compiled a complete listing of State foster care contacts (updated 5/09) as part of the 2009 National Foster Care Month campaign. For each State and the District of Columbia, the listing offers the appropriate organization/agency name, telephone number (when available), and website for those seeking to learn more about foster care or how to become a foster parent. Access the document online at:
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/fact-sheets.html

To access the PDF document directly, visit:
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/downloads/fact-sheets/Foster Care Contact List NFCM09.pdf




05/06/2009
Create a Lifebook : Free Course 'til June 1st

Spring is here! The season for new projects and fresh inspiration...a perfect time to start a Lifebook for your child, or to work on the one you already have. 
If you like the idea but don't know where to start, 
www.AdoptionLearningPartners.org can help!  The course covers some of the things that should be included in a Lifebook, and provides templates you can print out and use.
For the month of May, we are offering our course on
Lifebooks free of charge.  Beginning June 1, however, there will be a $30 fee.  So there's extra motivation to get started now!   Click here and start today.



 

05/05/09
State-Level Differences in Child and Family Well-Being

Research studies based on national statistics for the United States as a whole have documented differences in child and family well-being between children in low-income and higher-income families and between children in single-parent and two-parent families.  However, researchers have not explored differences in well-being in these families at the state level because of a general lack of comparable state-level data.
Two new Child Trends research briefs examine child and family well-being in two states by analyzing data from the National Survey of Children's Health.  In addition to supplying national-level data, this survey offers select state-level data that is important to understanding the health and well-being of children and families in a particular state.
1) Disparities in Health and Access to Insurance in Washington State 
A new Child Trends brief, Children's Access to Health Insurance and Health Status in Washington State: Influential Factors, finds that most children in Washington State are healthy and are covered by health insurance, but children from lower-income and lower-education households are disproportionately uninsured and disproportionately rely on public insurance.  
2) Differences in Child and Family Well-Being in Maryland
A second new Child Trends brief, The Well-Being of Maryland Parents and Their Children: Differences by Income Status and Family Structure, finds that most children and their parents in Maryland are functioning well in most areas, but there are significant differences in child and family well-being between children in low-income and higher-income families and between children in single-parent and two-parent families.

 

04/20/2009
Youth Benefit From Strong Families Regardless of Income

When families make the news, it is often for negative reasons such as violence or abuse.  However, families are critical to the positive development of children and youth, as well as to problems that may affect development.  A new Child Trends brief, Exploring The Links Between Family Strengths and Adolescent Outcomes, finds that family strengths are associated with significantly better outcomes for adolescents in both lower-income and higher-income families.   Family strengths include emotional/subjective strengths (such as close and caring parents); behavioral/concrete strengths (for example, parental monitoring and parent involvement); and passive parenting strengths (for instance, positive parental role modeling).  
Among the findings: 
- Adolescents who reported having close and caring parents are significantly more likely to perform well in school.  Higher parental monitoring and parent involvement are also associated with better school performance.
- These patterns were found in both lower- and higher-income families.
- Adolescents in families with higher parental monitoring are more likely to avoid risky behaviors.  Also, risky behaviors are significantly lower when parents are more close and caring and more involved. 
- These patterns were found for both lower- and higher-income families.
Focusing on family strengths identifies what we value and seek in families.  It also clarifies the behaviors and supports families can provide -- building close and caring relationships, monitoring, being involved, and setting a good example.  Moreover, it provides insights for funders, policymakers and service providers on ways that the strengths of families can be leveraged to improve services and, subsequently, outcomes for youth. 

This brief is based on data for adolescents ages 12-17 from the 2005 Every Child Every Promise Study conducted by America's Promise Alliance.

 

04/01/2009
Higher Education/ College Scholarship Information from Foster and Adoptive Family Services.

Do you have a child going to college that was previously in foster care in NJ?
Read the more detailed “Ask Our Experts” article from the NJ ARCH “Under the ARCH” Newsletter published March 2009.  Click here  to read the entire explanation of FAFS higher education scholarship information. Click here for the supplemental information referenced in the article. If you need assistance, please contact our office at 877-4ARCHNJ and we can print and send you the article(s) requested.




03/26/2009
Allocation of Title IV-E stimulus funds may help forestall cuts in foster care and adoption assistance that some states are currently considering


On Monday, March 16, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the first allocation of Title IV-E funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Under ARRA, Title IV-E foster care maintenance, adoption assistance, and kinship guardianship assistance will benefit from an increased federal match of 6.2% for all 50 states <http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/arrainstructions.pdf> . The increased match, similar to the increased match for Medicaid, is retroactive to October 1, 2008, and will last through December 31, 2010.
To read the entire article please click here




03/19/2009
White House Internship Program


President Obama today launched the White House Internship Program for his administration and announced that applications are currently being accepted for the summer of 2009. Those selected to participate in the program will gain valuable job experience and an inside look at the life of White House staff while building leadership skills.
For more information please click here



03/19/2009
Camp Excell: Programs Available in Monmouth and Bergen County


Camp Excel is a comprehensive program that includes academics to promote growth and avoid regression over the summer months,
therapeutic activities to assist in making friends and keeping friends, sports to develop skills and build self-esteem and recreational activities just for fun! Throughout the day, staff members provide encouragement and guidance in using appropriate social skills, giving children the opportunity to experience in the moment learning, learning that stays with them! We recognized the importance of family involvement and offer weekly Parent Groups to provide parenting information and support.
We also offer siblings groups for brothers and sisters to express their feelings regarding their special needs sibling.
For more information please click here




03/11/2009
CPFA Upcoming program and Discussion


Concerned Persons for Adoption (CPFA) will hold its FREE seasonal program on Wednesday, March 25 at 7:45 P.M. at the First Presbyterian
Church of Whippany. New member orientation is at 7:30 P.M. Programs are open to anyone concerned with adoption and admission is free.
To see the entire announcement please click here



 

02/24/2009
Summary and Section-by-Section Description of the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (H.R.6893)


To read the entire text please click here.




02/24/2009
Extended Families help Children avoid Foster Care


The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, meeting in Atlanta, voted Wednesday to recommend hepatitis A vaccinations for all close contacts of children coming from countries where hepatitis A is relatively common. That includes Guatemala, China, Russia and Ethiopia — four countries that are currently the major sources of international adoptions. The committee makes recommendations to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
To read the entire article please click here.




02/04/2009
Finding Family Roots is Relatively Easy


If you're trying to track down your family history, the Social Security Administration's Death Master File is a good place to start.
To read the entire article please click here.


 

02/04/2009
Adopted Children and IQ

From 5,003 files of adopted children, 65 deprived children, defined as abused and or neglected during infancy, were strictly selected with particular reference to two criteria: (i) They were adopted between 4 and 6 years of age, and (ii) they had an IQ <86 (mean 5 77, SD 5 6.3) before adoption. The average IQs of adopted children in lower and higher socioeconomic status (SES) families were 85 (SD 5 17) and 98 (SD 5 14.6), respectively, at adolescence (mean age 5 13.5 years). The results show (i) a significant gain in IQ dependent on the SES of the adoptive families (mean57.7 and mean 5 19.5 IQ points in low and high SES, respectively), (ii) IQs after adoption are significantly correlated with IQs before adoption, and (iii) during adolescence, verbal IQs are significantly lower than performance IQs.
T p read the entire article please click here


 

02/04/2009
Effects of Childhood Stress

Stress activates many of the body’s physical systems that assist in coping. However, children experience different amounts and intensity of stress owing to family difficulties, economic stress, and other factors, and their capacities to cope depend crucially on the support of adults. "Allostatic load" refers to the measurement of the cumulative wear and tear on the body that results from experiencing stress. Research shows that high allostatic load in childhood is associated with long-term vulnerability to poor health and mental health outcomes, and that these effects begin early in life. As the term implies, children carry a high burden of potential vulnerability when the allostatic load is high. But are there factors, such as support from close relationships, which can help to buffer children from the effects of stress on allostatic load?
To read the entire article please click here



12/02/2009
Childhood Stress Affects Health Years Later

Children who spent their first years in institutions before being adopted by loving and affluent families still suffered long-term damage to their immune systems as a result of early emotional stress, according to a University of Wisconsin study posted Monday with the online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Even the health of children adopted before the age of 3 who then spent more than a decade with their new families were no better than the health of children who had spent their entire childhoods in abusive families.
To read the entire article please click here



01/22/2009/
Adoption Costs Piece On Today Show

A great Today Show program on the cost of adopting today and a relatively new organization to help finance some adoptions started by an adoptive couple called HelpUSAdopt.org http://www.helpusadopt.org/  
Think it’s worth taking a look at the piece that aired this morning on the Today Show:  To view the piece log onto  http://today.msnbc.msn.com/ and select “The High Cost of Adoption”; they do mention at the end foster care adoptions.   The direct link is:  http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/26184891/vp/28790962#28790962    (may or may not work on your browser).



01/21/2009
The Heart Gallery Newest Project  


The Heart Gallery's newest project Do 1 Thing launches on Valentines Day 2009.
More than 100 of the world's most recognized names in photography including 30 Pulitzer-prize winners are coming together to put a "face" on homelessness while asking you to put a "face on activism.
Three out of every 10 homeless adults admit to a history in foster care and with 25,000 youths aging out of foster care each year, thousands will experience homelessness.
On the day Americans spend 14 billion dollars telling each other how much they care, join us in Doing 1 Thing to help these vulnerable youth.

do 1 thing logo

Stay up to date on the project on our Facebook Causes Page

 

01/21/2009
Heart Gallery Reception at Johnson &Johnson 


You're invited to the Heart Gallery reception at Johnson & Johnson on Thursday, January 22nd, 2009; log onto www.heartgallerynj.org for more information.  The children featured in the Heart Gallery are deserving of dignity and respect and, most importantly, a possible ticket to a new life. It is our hope that these portraits will touch prospective parents across the country and encourage them to adopt.  Doesn't everybody deserve a family?    RSVP to Patty Hickey at phickey1@its.jnj.com .


 

01/07/2009
Facts at a Glance


Since 1983, Child Trends has produced Facts at a Glance, an annual newsletter highlighting national data on teen pregnancy, childbearing, and sexual behavior.  For the most recent years, state-by-state and city-by-city comparisions are available.  In some years, an explanatory cover sheet gives more background information for the Facts at a Glance in that year. 
To read more please visit  http://www.childtrends.org/_listFAAG.cfm?LID=06C2494C-82B6-4FF8-8DCF0E98D39E016C